The Great Heartland Biscuit Thread

Does exactly what it says on the tin. Some of the nonsense contained herein may be very loosely related to The Sisters of Mercy, but I wouldn't bet your PayPal account on it. In keeping with the internet's general theme nothing written here should be taken as Gospel: over three quarters of it is utter gibberish, and most of the forum's denizens haven't spoken to another human being face-to-face for decades. Don't worry your pretty little heads about it. Above all else, remember this: You don't have to stay forever. I will understand.
Microcosmia
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EvilBastard wrote:Apparently the correct pronunciation of Nice rhymes with ice, lice, and (if you come from the Home Counties) house.
And so another childhood certainty disintegrates into crumbs. I thought my mother was infallible on this one :lol:
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Weren't they originally called faite à nice, as in made in nice, which would suggest the niece pronunciation.
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Swinnow wrote:Weren't they originally called faite à nice, as in made in nice, which would suggest the niece pronunciation.
Well, that's what the Australians claim (and I'm not entirely sure we should trust anyone who celebrates Christmas in the middle of the summer). However, St. Paedo of Wiki disagrees, as does Hill Biscuits, who claim that they were
Hill Biscuits wrote:simply named because of their "nice" taste. This was apparently changed when Queen Victoria visited Nice in France and took these, her favourite biscuits with her.
And although I would never ever attempt to take issue with Microcosmia's mum, because that's not a nice thing (no pun intended) to do, I suspect that they started to be pronounced "Niece" biscuits because people thought that that was a bit more sophisticated, and the net-curtain-and-ceramic-dog brigade probably felt that it was "common" to refer to them as "Nice".
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This is all well & good but I was perfectly happy to call them "disgusting" and be done with it.
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Swinnow
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EvilBastard wrote:Well, that's what the Australians claim......
It was my Mum what said it, and she wasn't named Sheila or claimed to be Australian, she was of Irish stock, probably why she agreed with Microcosmia's Mum.
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Swinnow wrote:
EvilBastard wrote:Well, that's what the Australians claim......
It was my Mum what said it, and she wasn't named Sheila or claimed to be Australian, she was of Irish stock, probably why she agreed with Microcosmia's Mum.
It might be a peculiarly Irish thing alright. Maybe it's the real reason Ireland alone had to vote twice on the Nice Treaty :lol:
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I thought of this thread last night when I read the question, "What do they call English muffins in England?"

The answer...eventually... was "just muffins". And now I need to know if you have muffins. Blueberry, bran, chocolate chip little cupcakes with a paper wrapper and a bulbous top. I can't remember ever seeing one over there.

I'm also wondering what KFC calls a biscuit in the UK, but I'll google that. I want you to enlighten me about the muffin.

EDIT: I googled the KFC menu. YOU DON'T HAVE BISUCUITS?? :eek:
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Chaotican wrote:I thought of this thread last night when I read the question, "What do they call English muffins in England?"

The answer...eventually... was "just muffins". And now I need to know if you have muffins. Blueberry, bran, chocolate chip little cupcakes with a paper wrapper and a bulbous top. I can't remember ever seeing one over there.

I'm also wondering what KFC calls a biscuit in the UK, but I'll google that. I want you to enlighten me about the muffin.

EDIT: I googled the KFC menu. YOU DON'T HAVE BISUCUITS?? :eek:
Yeah, biscuit in the US is a wee bit different to the rest of the world.
As for muffins, I guess an "English" muffin would be best named "breakfast" muffin & are totally different to muffins (confused yet?)
I wouldn't dunk either in tea or coffee though. They would disintegrate almost immediately :lol:
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The things that you call muffins, we tend to call "cakes", "cupcakes", or "muffins" (despite "English muffins" also being muffins).

The nearest thing that you'll get to an American biscuit in the UK is probably a scone, which tends to be sweet rather than savoury.
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Yeah, when I was young a muffin was totally different. Google an 'oven bottom muffin' and you'll see what they used to look like. Nowadays the term is taken to mean the "American" muffin.
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When I was young, a muffin was a marionette in the form of a mule.

And no, we don't have American biscuits in England. We do, however, have crumpets.
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EvilBastard wrote:When I was young, a muffin was a marionette in the form of a mule.

And no, we don't have American biscuits in England. We do, however, have crumpets.
Crumpets being the king of bread products.
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Alex66 wrote:
EvilBastard wrote:When I was young, a muffin was a marionette in the form of a mule.

And no, we don't have American biscuits in England. We do, however, have crumpets.
Crumpets being the king of bread products.
:notworthy: :notworthy:

I make my own :D
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Chaotican
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I understand the regional preferences for what people do with flour, and I even buy crumpets sometimes.

But...Kentucky Fried Chicken is about the biscuit. That's their thing. Its like Pizza Hut skipping the pizza in Japan in favor of sushi. Just...no!
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Can't beat a bit of crumpet
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Chaotican wrote: But...Kentucky Fried Chicken is about the biscuit.
I tried that biscuit when I lived in Fort Worth & it was drowned in white gravy. I was told it was delish.
It wasn't. :urff:
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I used to stay in a Holiday Inn Express fairly regularly for work, and they did sausage "patties", biscuits, and "sawmill" gravy at the breakfast buffet. My standards may be low, but the breakfasts were the highpoint of those work trips. I've nothing against American biscuits, per see - I just wish they wouldn't call them biscuits. It's very confusing.
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Swinnow wrote:Can't beat a bit of crumpet
Well, you can, so long as she's ok with that. It takes all sorts... :innocent:
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EvilBastard wrote:I used to stay in a Holiday Inn Express fairly regularly for work, and they did sausage "patties", biscuits, and "sawmill" gravy at the breakfast buffet. My standards may be low, but the breakfasts were the highpoint of those work trips. I've nothing against American biscuits, per see - I just wish they wouldn't call them biscuits. It's very confusing.
Oh, biscuits are vile pieces of lard and gluten, no doubt. I have a lot against them. They just belong with KFC. Which is also fairly vile.

Biscuit = American cookie. (Oddly, though, dog cookies are still called biscuits.)
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Just caught my mate dipping a biccy in her cider before we hit Leeds for a bevy or three. Not the behaviour I expect from a Cheshire girl lol
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I've always thought of American "biscuits" as sub-par scones. :(
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Swinnow wrote:Just caught my mate dipping a biccy in her cider before we hit Leeds for a bevy or three. Not the behaviour I expect from a Cheshire girl lol
I'm both appalled and intrigued...
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Before I read through this lovely thread and researched a bit about traditions, I had no idea that things like this could ever exist ...

https://de.pinterest.com/artasyoulikeit/dunk-mug/ ... :lol: :lol: ...
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Being645 wrote:Before I read through this lovely thread and researched a bit about traditions, I had no idea that things like this could ever exist ...

https://de.pinterest.com/artasyoulikeit/dunk-mug/ ... :lol: :lol: ...
:lol:
About time the Sisters online store had some
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What kind of is this some sort of delicious biscuit?? ;D 8)
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